Body Mechanics (Myles, Read this)

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Myles Cupp
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Re: Body Mechanics (Myles, Read this)

Postby Myles Cupp » Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:52 pm

Its not better or worse persay, just an add-on. You still need to start out of measure with the tennis ball initially for the first (hopefully easy) shot. However, once you get it going you have to retreat out of distance again if you want to have any chance of hitting the tennis ball again.
You must also tap it like in the original drill otherwise the tennis ball will have way too much movement for you to be able to hit it again.

So I'd still recommend doing William's original exercise with a completely stationary target as practice for the much more difficult exercise of hitting a tennis ball on a string. I used a dartboard actually for working on stationary epee point control. Work out of distance of the target like William said and get your thighs stretched out with some lunging (don't forget to do basic stretches before ANY of the workouts discussed in this thread!) without needing to worry about damaging the wall.

Many of you will be surprised how far you are able to lunge.
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Psalm 119:89
"For we all acknowledge that it is with the sword that Kingdoms are protected, Religions are defended, injuries are avenged and Nations achieve peace and happiness."
Salvator Fabris, 1606

Peter Hoff
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Re: Body Mechanics (Myles, Read this)

Postby Peter Hoff » Fri Dec 03, 2010 2:01 pm

First, we have done drills similar to the attack/defense drill Myles described in his first post, but it hasn't been a part of our regular regimen. It is an excellent plan.

Most martial arts uses Forms (or Katas, if you prefer) to build balance, footwork, combinations of attacks, etc. Kron has consciously decided not to develop katas since we generally prefer to encourage a more dynamic approach to combat. Your opponent is unlikely to follow your choreography, after all. Flouryshing has been our intended way to fill this void, but we haven't been doing much of it lately. I highly recommend flouryshing regularly.

I have another activity that I've run as an intermediary between drills and sparring, which I think is especially good for relative beginners (as in maybe the meeting before the sparring class). I did it in 3 stages, but it could certainly go beyond that. You probably need a small group though. It's dynamic, so the results could vary widely.

Stage 1: Have two people face off in guards of their choice. The first chooses an attack, the second has to work out a defense. This could take a few tries. Once something reasonable has been worked out, repeat a few times to get the feel of it and work out any minor kinks.

Stage 2: The second person comes up with a counter attack they can execute from their chosen defense. Again, this often takes a few tries, and should be repeated a few times once something reasonable is found.

Stage 3: The first person works out a defense against the counter, as above.

Obviously you could keep going in this manner for as many iterations as you can keep in your head. Essentially, you're dynamically building your own play. I think this helps build a sense of what works and what doesn't, as well as fostering the situational analysis necessary for sparring. Ideally, you'd have 1-3 pairs with an instructor overseeing/advising. If one pair comes up with something particularly good, share it with the others.

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Myles Cupp
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Re: Body Mechanics (Myles, Read this)

Postby Myles Cupp » Sun Dec 05, 2010 12:29 am

I am glad to see you formalize that drill in such a way Peter. My brother and I have been doing something similar so I can force my brother to exercise a bit of his intuition with just the few basics I've shown him so far.
I've executed a slow attack (we're both wearing masks and padded fencing gloves) and told him to try and block. Often he responds "but I don't know how" and I'll just say "well block me using the basics of what we know and see what works" and in order to make sure we're on the right track I consult the Lindholm translation of Ringeck for some guidance in lieu of an instructor.
Lifetime HEMAA Member
Kron Martial Arts, CA
Psalm 119:89
"For we all acknowledge that it is with the sword that Kingdoms are protected, Religions are defended, injuries are avenged and Nations achieve peace and happiness."
Salvator Fabris, 1606


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