Ex Libris - Assorted Manuals and Texts

For internal business and projects of Kron Martial Arts. Non-Kron users are welcome to post relevant material.
william_cain_iii
HEMA Alliance Member
Posts: 814
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2010 11:28 am
Location: Apple Valley, CA
Contact:

Ex Libris - Assorted Manuals and Texts

Postby william_cain_iii » Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:37 am

This is a companion thread to my Wonderful Weapons thread. I'll be providing what reference I can to assorted medieval texts, and what sources I can find for them. Check this post fairly often, because as I expand my understanding of various manuals, I'll be posting revised thoughts on each one.

Further, if anyone on this site has a particular manual/publication they are familiar with and would like to explain to us, I invite you to do so. The purpose of this thread is to be an authoritative collection on the published and digital editions of the sources we're most interested in.

That said, let's get reading.
Last edited by william_cain_iii on Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Do right, there is nothing else.
myself

william_cain_iii
HEMA Alliance Member
Posts: 814
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2010 11:28 am
Location: Apple Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: Ex Libris - Assorted Manuals and Texts

Postby william_cain_iii » Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:44 am

The Wiktenauer

Michael Chidester is a name some of you might not know, but a name all of you should know.

Mr. Chidester has devoted an extraordinary amount of his time to building this project, the Wiktenauer, as a free resource for anyone seeking to study the manuals of our Art. Already there is an extensive body of works on the German tradition up for any of us to look at, freely. The significance of this may not seem evident, but as you continue to study you will come to know and understand why this is such an important archive for us to have.

Yes, there is a certain value in having a physical copy of a book in your hand. But many of the books available today are not simply translations, but interpretations. They're commentaries brought through the eyes of the author of a particular work. Tobler's edition of Ringeck demonstrates this through the poses in the photographs - numerous students of the Art find them stiff and unmartial. Lindholm's edition of Ringeck has this as well, as in one infamous portion of the book he essentially says, 'I know Ringeck says one thing here, but I believe he meant something else.'

The Wiktenauer is different. It posts translations and scans, and compares the different editions of the source material. That is all. It is raw information available to those scholars of the Art who would seek it out free of the interpretations of others. Spend a little time each week at this site on material in your preferred mode of study, and you will not regret it.
Do right, there is nothing else.
myself

william_cain_iii
HEMA Alliance Member
Posts: 814
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2010 11:28 am
Location: Apple Valley, CA
Contact:

Re: Ex Libris - Assorted Manuals and Texts

Postby william_cain_iii » Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:04 am

Sigmund Von Ein Ringeck, or Sigmund Amring

I began with Meyer, but the bulk of my studies to date have been from the Ringeck material. As mentioned in the article above, he is not the sole author of the work he is presented in, and it may be that his treatises were simply gathered into an omnibus style work by another party. However, for shorthand we refer to these materials as the Ringeck works.

Ringeck begins with some basic entrywork material, and is in many ways 'simpler' in its presentation than later works such as Meyer, or alternative sources such as Wallerstein. There is a straightforwardness in this material that appeals to me, and I do encourage folks to take a look at it.

At the moment, I believe there are two translations and interpretations thus far published that most people seek out for their use. There may be others, but these are the two I know of:

Lindholm's Ringeck

This collection is split into two works, Sigmund Ringeck's Knightly Art of the Longsword, and Sigmund Ringeck's Knightly Arts of Combat. The first book covers the core of what we are interested in, bloßfechten (bloss-fekten) or unarmoured fighting. The guards, steps, mastercuts, binding, winding, and unarmored ringen am schwert (wrestling at the sword) are covered in this section. There are illustrations and translations to look through, and it's laid out in landscape format to make flipping through easy and fun. The second is more like a textbook, and covers a variety of subjects. Basic Kampfringen, Harnesschfechten (armored fighting), some sword and buckler, and other assorted arts are covered in this section. Between these two books, it's relatively easy to build a solid multi-discipline curriculum for a German-tradition School.

The whole set or its components can be had at Paladin Press via this link.

Lindholm's Ringeck

Christian Tobler's Secrets of German Medieval Swordsmanship: Sigmund Ringeck's Commentaries on Liechtenauer

I'm not as familiar with this one, as I haven't had a chance to study it in depth. However, multiple sources have told me that while the pictures are a bit awkward in their interpretation (note this is just what I have heard, not my own informed judgment), Tobler's scholarship into the text itself is among the best available. He provides the german and the translation for people to compare, so it really is a worthwhile source to consider. Having both the Lindholm and the Tobler will allow a student to compare between editions and avoid the trap of thinking too greatly along one line or the other.

It can be had at Amazon via this link:

Secrets of German Medieval Swordsmanship: Sigmund Ringeck's Commentaries on Liechtenauer

As ever, seek out many viewpoints on any of these works. The Art thrives in the clear light of knowledge, and dies in the dank closets of dogma.

Yours Fraternally,

William
Do right, there is nothing else.
myself

User avatar
Myles Cupp
HEMA Alliance Member
Posts: 963
Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 10:18 am

Re: Ex Libris - Assorted Manuals and Texts

Postby Myles Cupp » Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:16 am

Let no one underestimate the power of the Wiktenauer. The stuff on that website is as close as you can get to real, hardcore historical research without going to some museum and seeing the books for yourself. The importance of primary sources cannot be overstated. I'm on the Wiktenauer almost everyday now.
Lifetime HEMAA Member
Kron Martial Arts, CA
Psalm 119:89
"For we all acknowledge that it is with the sword that Kingdoms are protected, Religions are defended, injuries are avenged and Nations achieve peace and happiness."
Salvator Fabris, 1606


Return to “Kron Martial Arts”