Good to see!

NoVA-Assalto is an organization based in Northern Virginia with the goal of organizing events and information involving 16th century Bolognese swordsmanship.
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Keith P. Myers
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Good to see!

Postby Keith P. Myers » Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:17 pm

Good to see a subforum for NoVa-Assalto here! Hopefully we'll see some good "Bolognese" discussion. ;)
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A Froster
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Re: Good to see!

Postby A Froster » Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:53 am

Yes, I agree with Keith.

Any chance we can see some of the Bolognese style fencing posted here?

By the way the timeline of manuscripts you posted on your website is way cool http://nova-assalto.salvatorfabris.com/?p=33
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Re: Good to see!

Postby Steven Reich » Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:21 am

A Froster wrote:Any chance we can see some of the Bolognese style fencing posted here?[/url]
At some point, I want to put video of various actions online. I don't think I have any video of fencing, but to really "see" what Bolognese looks like, the to-man set-plays are probably a better idea anyway (although video of both would be a goal at some point).

A Froster wrote:By the way the timeline of manuscripts you posted on your website is way cool http://nova-assalto.salvatorfabris.com/?p=33

Glad you like that, I did that back in 2004 or so, but it languished on the OSH site (I don't know if anyone even noticed it). I need to update it as it is missing a few works (e.g. Anonimo Bolognese, Altoni, et al.). However, I need to locate the original Photoshop version of the image...

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Re: Good to see!

Postby Steven Reich » Wed Dec 01, 2010 4:00 am

A Froster wrote:By the way the timeline of manuscripts you posted on your website is way cool http://nova-assalto.salvatorfabris.com/?p=33

Note that the Url for this is now: http://www.nova-assalto.com/?p=33
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Re: Good to see!

Postby Steven Reich » Wed Dec 01, 2010 4:48 pm

Kevin Maurer wrote:Love your web site! Great reading, your most recent article on the six preparations of the cut, is very informative.


Kevin Maurer wrote:It would be super helpful if there were a resource that listed the english translations of the Italian Terms. I know that is a special need of mine for current translation projects, and I bet a lot of other folks could use it too. Do you know of one?

I have one targeted on Bolognese and 15th century Italian swordsmanship in the works. I'll try to get a rudimentary version up very soon.

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Re: Good to see!

Postby Steven Reich » Fri Dec 03, 2010 6:43 am

Steven Reich wrote:
Kevin Maurer wrote:It would be super helpful if there were a resource that listed the english translations of the Italian Terms. I know that is a special need of mine for current translation projects, and I bet a lot of other folks could use it too. Do you know of one?

I have one targeted on Bolognese and 15th century Italian swordsmanship in the works. I'll try to get a rudimentary version up very soon.

As and you shall receive: A Glossary for 16th Century Italian Swordsmanship. Actually, this is more of a typical glossary of 16th century Italian terminology, so it might not quite fit what you're looking for. That is, I tended to include terms that would stay in Italian instead of those that would be translated into English (i.e. technical terms such as the names of the cuts, etc.) Note that this is a work in progress.

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Re: Good to see!

Postby Steven Reich » Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:02 am

Kevin Maurer wrote:Steven, thanks for this Glossary, it is extremely helpful to me, this is actually, essential for me, as i am continuing to translate German versions of the Italian Rappier arts. I find the 1619 Salvator Fabri printing by Isaak Elzevier, to be interesting. The dedication is to Prince Gustav of Sweden no less! That was the big time! and this work of Salvatoris Fabri is said by the author to have been translated into Hochdeutsch, or HighGerman. This thing could represent a whole new understanding for us about the translating of Italian into High German, german to english. I am interested to see how closely this parallels the original. It appears to, with the division of two books.
Do you know anything about it?

I don't know anything about it, sounds interesting though.

Kevin Maurer wrote:Thanks again for the Glossary. I am better able to visualize as i am translating, makes things easier.

If you have any specific questions about Italian terminology that isn't covered in a glossary, I'm happy to answer that, too. I ought to do a 17th century Italian fencing glossary, too, since that will cover terms that don't generally appear in the 16th century stuff (e.g. chiamata, cavazione, etc.)

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Re: Good to see!

Postby Michael Chidester » Mon Dec 06, 2010 4:21 pm

Kevin Maurer wrote:and this work of Salvatoris Fabri is said by the author to have been translated into Hochdeutsch, or HighGerman. This thing could represent a whole new understanding for us about the translating of Italian into High German, german to english. I am interested to see how closely this parallels the original. It appears to, with the division of two books.
Do you know anything about it?

Assuming there's only one German translation of Fabris from 1619, I have scans of it (as well as a different German version from 1626). The 1619 date is interesting because Hans Wilhelm Schoeffer's book, which seems to be a repetition/interpretation of Fabris, is dated just one year later.
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